[  3  /  a  /  adv  /  an  /  c  /  cgl  /  ck  /  cm  /  co  /  diy  /  fa  /  fit  /  g  /  i  /  ic  /  jp  /  k  /  lit  /  m  /  mlp  /  mu  /  n  /  o  /  p  /  po  /  q  /  sci  /  sp  /  tg  /  toy  /  trv  /  tv  /  v  /  vg  /  vp  /  w  /  wg  /  wsg  /  x  ]

/diy/ Do-It-Yourself

Warning: All the content of this page originally come from 4chan.org. This is only a partial archive made to avoid destruction. Some posts and images may be missing. All the messages below have been posted by anonymous users and we do not guarantee any truth of what they said.
For any illegal content, please contact me so that I can immediatly destroy it!

Anonymous 2015-09-24 04:02:31 No.879093

[Missing image file: ]

I'm not sure if this is the right forum to be posting this, but I'm in desperate need of some help with cleaning motor oil stains and also power steering stains from concrete. I am going to be moving within the next week and I would really like to try to get all/most of my deposit back, so I'm hoping to be able to do a good job of cleaning up the stains that my 2 vehicles have left on the concrete out back of my apartment over the last two years.

I have already searched Google for ideas and there seem to be some good ones, but I was hoping to get some specific suggestions for both motor oil and power steering fluid.

Also, does anyone know if I will likely need or benefit from renting a power washer? Or will I probably just need to use some sort of concrete cleaning solutions and a scrub brush and my garden hose?

Any and all helpful replies will be genuinely appreciated!

> Pic related: The Power Steering Fluid stains (and debris that has stuck to it while my car was not there) on the concrete where I park my car.


>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 04:10:37 No.879098
>>879093
And this is a picture of some of the oil stains. These have actually been accumulating over the course of the past 24 months, and while I did lay down a fairly large oil pan and some cat litter where I park after a couple weeks, someone rode their bike across it within a few days and bent it, and it also rained several times while my vehicle was not there, and I eventually got discouraged and just left it as-is and hoped that I parked over the pan and prevented the oil that leaked while my car was parked from getting on the concrete more than it already had.

Also, as mentioned, this oil pan and cat litter was originally put there almost two years ago, so there is also dirt/mud that has accumulated on it along with the cat litter, and that's why it looks this way.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 04:11:57 No.879099
>>879098
Another view of the oil stains and dirt/cat litter-covered oil pan.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 04:13:30 No.879102
>>879098
>>879099
And a side view of the oil stains and dirt/cat litter-covered oil pan.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 04:37:38 No.879112
>>879093
>Or will I probably just need to use some sort of concrete cleaning solutions and a scrub brush and my garden hose?
I'd go with this
I used some concrete cleaner my landlady left at my previous place to clean up some stains and it worked pretty well for the stains my car left which was more than oil as well.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 05:01:31 No.879122
>>879112
Thanks for replying! Do you recall the name of the stuff that you used? Also, how large was the area where your oil had spilled? How long did it take you to clean? And how noticeable were the stains after you got done?

Btw, was the concrete cleaner that you used powder or liquid?

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 05:10:28 No.879130
>>879093
A hardware store will have stuff for this. Essentially it's the cheap ass kitty litter stuff. You need to actually rub this into the concrete.

Pour it on, rub it in with your foot. Sweep it away. Pour more on, rub it in, sweep. Continue till it's mostly gone. At this point it may be acceptable. If it needs to be perfect, scrub it with a hard bristled brush and a strong de-greaser or concentrated dish soap and a little water.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 05:23:49 No.879135
>>879130
Thanks for the response! I do intend on doing what you suggested with regards to rubbing in something with my feet over and over, but I'm curious, does it possibly matter that these stains have been setting on the concrete for almost two years? Have they been sitting there for so long that they just can not be removed? Or, after it's been on there for a few days/weeks, is the oil/power steering fluid as set as it's going to get?

Also, with regards to the cat litter-type stuff, does it basically just cover up the oil/fluid and make the surface look more like concrete? And if so, will this likely actually become part of the concrete? or will it wash away and make the stains visible again rather easily?

I'm just concerned that my landlord will notice if the stains become visible again and then try to charge me for the damage/potential cleaning costs. So, that's why I'm asking such detailed/thorough questions.

I am sorry if my being so thorough is annoying; I'm just trying to get some helpful information. And I most definitely appreciate the replies!

> Pic related: A picture that would seem to be similar to what you were suggesting.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 06:34:29 No.879149
>>879135

cat litter is meant to soak up freshly spilled oil to keep it from all seeping into the concrete. You typically lay it down over a fresh spill and then scoop it up once it has taken on as much moisture as possible (oil instead of cat urine). The point you are at you need to use either a hydrocarbon (gasoline) or emulsifier to get what is left out.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 07:16:05 No.879155
>>879122
if that doesnt work, get a spray can or brake cleaner from any car shop, they all work great.

i work in a lube shop, we use it for everything.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 07:30:51 No.879158
>>879155
can of*

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 07:44:19 No.879162
Sup OP. I was in the same boat and got off with a few cans of engine degreaser. I found much to my delight the degreaser penetrated into the cement and lifted the oil out where it could be absorbed as per >>879135 (as has been correctly pointed out, this method only works for "wet" spills). I emptied two cans of degrease onto it, gave it an overnight soak up with sawdust (I'd go crushed kitty litter if I had the option, sawdust was all I had on hand) Next day I hit it with more degrease and some water (degrease = water soluble, oil floats on water, shit lifted to the top like cream) and a final hose off, the patch where the oil was ended up cleaner than the surrounding cement. After your initial overnight soak up, and if it's an option, give it a hose down, apply degreaser, let sit for 10 minutes, hose off, apply degreaser, let sit for 10 minutes, rinse, repeat until you stop seeing dem oily rainbows on the water, and you're pretty much good.

Meanwhile, as a property owner, don't stress too much about it. If it's obvious you've done your best to clean it and it's not so bad that you're leaving oily footprints everywhere I would have no fucks to give about it (and prolly ask you what you fucked up, then laugh at your misfortune). End if the day it's a garage, can't be expected to be pristine if a vehicle is being kept in there. Worst comes to worst tell your landie you got your car fixed, the spanner who did it cross threaded your sump plug, and the thing dropped its guts when you got home. Shit happens etc.

Godspeed anon.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 08:50:29 No.879178
>>879149
>>879149
>>879162
First off, thank you both very much for your replies and the information you provided. I greatly appreciate it!

I also posted this on another site and this is the first response I got:

>Sweep up the dirt and crap.
>Get a gallon of lacquer thinner and a bag of NON clumping kitty litter. The cheap stuff
>Pour lacquer thinner straight n the stain. Scrub with a stiff floor brush. Pour litter ver the area. Sweep up

>The lacquer thinner penetrates and lifts the oil. The kitty litter absorbs it. I've successfully used this tactic. It may take a few applications if it's really embedded

>Why is your Ford leaking so bad?"

---------------------------------------------------------

OK, OP back now. Out of the 3 fluids that have been mentioned, is one of the 3 a better option than the others (likely to be more-effective on these old stains, cheaper, more easily-available)?

1.) Spray Brake Cleaner
2.) Engine De-greaser
3.) Lacquer Thinner

And should I consider renting a power washer to spray off the cement after trying out these cleaning methods? Or will a regular garden hose with a spray nozzle likely be sufficient to wash it off afterward?

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 08:55:17 No.879179
>>879178
Well, every time I have tried to use brake cleaner it has evaporated in minutes, I would be going with de-greaser (ya know, that stuff made specifically to break down engine oils), but any solvent that can break down oils and does not evaporate in seconds will do the trick. The process mentioned in this post looks on point though.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 09:01:36 No.879181
>>879162
Also, I should clarify that this is not actually concrete in a garage. I live in a apartment fourplex (small single-level building with 4 units) and these stains are on the concrete that is out back near the alley in the rear of my unit. There is concrete out back where we can park our cars, and it is about 15 feet by about 60 feet and I park both of my vehicles on one side of it, with none parking on the other side, so after I move my vehicles, the area where they were parked will be completely out in the open and highly-visible. So, my landlord (the owner of the property) is going to notice how bad the stains are, for sure, and she has specifically wanted me to clean them up for months.

As I mentioned earlier, though, there would not be much of a reason to clean up these areas, as my vehicles were still going to be parked there and would just continue to leak motor oil and power steering fluid on these same areas.

However, now that I am moving, I really want to try to do a good job of cleaning the parts of the concrete that my vehicles leaked on and, hopefully, make the stains significantly less-noticeable.


Btw, with regards to pouring kitty litter and grinding it in to the cement, I'm assuming that part of this is because the litter will actually be ground into the concrete and make it look like normal concrete, since they are similar-looking. Am I right about that? Basically, the cat litter will actually help to literally cover up the stains?

> Pic related: The NON-Clumping cat litter that I am planning on buying.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 09:13:16 No.879187
>>879179
Thanks for replying!

Are you referring to this being a good process to try:

>Sweep up the dirt and crap.
>Get a gallon of lacquer thinner and a bag of NON clumping kitty litter. The cheap stuff
>Pour lacquer thinner straight n the stain. Scrub with a stiff floor brush. Pour litter ver the area. Sweep up

>The lacquer thinner penetrates and lifts the oil. The kitty litter absorbs it. I've successfully used this tactic. It may take a few applications if it's really embedded


And are you suggesting to try this process, but with some sort of degreaser instead of lacquer thinner? If so, is there a specific or general type of degreaser that I should try to use? And where would you suggest trying to look for and buy the degreaser from? Auto Zone or O'Reilly Auto Parts or some place like that? Or Lowe's or the Home Depot? Or Walmart or Target? If possible, I'd like to be able to buy it from an actual store, as I don't have enough time to wait several days for shipping.

Sorry for asking so many questions. I'm just trying to get myself informed and be through and detailed while asking questions.

As always, much thanks for the replies!


Btw, has anyone here tried this Oil Eater Cleaner Degreaser stuff that I'm uploading a picture of? And would this likely be a good product to try? Or probably not, for oil and power steering fluid stains that are several months old?

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 10:00:39 No.879191
>>879187
I'm not the same anon, but in my experience, it's generally the cheap noname stuff that works better when using it for it's non intended purpose. I paid a dollar for a bag of cat litter at the dollar store and it worked better than I expected (and even on its own took out some worked in stains). I say just go to the dollar store and find some generic degreaser. Work your way up from there and report back.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 10:25:37 No.879198
>>879191
Thanks for the response! I actually have to be out by Sept. 30th, 6 days from today, and I also have to find a place to move my Explorer to, before I can even start working on the motor oil stains underneath it, so I've got to start working on this soon. I meant to start this thread many times before this, but with my OCD (I'm not saying that jokingly), I hate the thought of having to type, as I suck at typing, and I know that I am going to end up typing way more than is necessary, so I just kept putting it off.

As for something that I can realistically do later today, I can certainly get some cheap (under-$5) degreaser and some cheap ($1-$2) non-clumping cat litter and see how much it might help. And I will plan on coming back and posting updated pics, if this thread is still active. I have no idea how long threads typically stay active on here, though; so I'm not sure how likely it is to still be active 12-16 hours from now.

And if it 404's before I come back to reply again, much thanks to all of you who took the time to reply. Please know that it is very much appreciated!

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 10:28:44 No.879203
>>879198
>I meant to start this thread many times before this, but with my OCD (I'm not saying that jokingly), I hate the thought of having to type, as I suck at typing, and I know that I am going to end up typing way more than is necessary, so I just kept putting it off.

Sweet jesus I know this feel. Crippling IRL, I know I have a point to make but am too scared to open my mouth in case it becomes a ramble. More often than not it doesn't but dat fear man, dat fear.

bbl, >>>/adv/

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 11:23:40 No.879217
>>879203
Thanks for the empathy. And, I'm sorry to hear that you have this stupid, ridiculous shit, too! :)

Many people think they suffer from a little O.C.D. (and they might), but most people have no idea how difficult this stupid fucking way of thinking actually makes one's life. And something that really pisses me off about it is that I realized long ago (several years ago, actually) that it's not logical to think that my O.C.D. "rituals" realistically have any affect on anything that actually benefits me (or anyone else) in any way. But, I've been having these stupid, fucking ridiculous thoughts and worries for so many years that it's seemingly fucking impossible to stop my brain from thinking this way, after having done it for about 25 years now.

I like to try to describe O.C.D. to others as having an incredibly powerful superstition, that causes you to severely worry that something bad will happen, to someone you care about, if you don't do something/stop doing something while having a (positive) thought that you are comfortable with. It's fucking stupid and unreasonable and irrational, and seriously draining and aggravating. It has made me late to work and caused me some sort of completely unnecessary inconvenience/annoyance many times over the years - yet, I still can not stop myself from going through the same stupid fucking routines and thought processes that I have gone through thousands of times over the 25 years or so.

Sorry for the rant. As for the >>>/adv/ link, is that to ask for advice about the oil/power steering fluid stains? Or the O.C.D.?

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 12:12:41 No.879240
>>879093
to get old oil stains off concrete (not asphalt) the best way is to pour some gasoline or kerosene on the oil, let that sit for about 30 seconds to soak in, and then pour some plain cat litter down and sweep that around. the gasoline dissolves the oil temporarily, and then the oil sticks to the kitty litter when you pour that on. the gasoline will evaporate away from the kitty litter in a couple hours.

the first time you do this, it will get around 90-95% of the stain off with almost no effort. after that it helps less and less, but you can try it twice.

DO NOT use water! that won't work. the oil stain must be totally dry..... water and oil don't mix, and there's no soap worth a shit for this. Just use the gas and it will work.

proof: next time you are at a gas station, look at the ground where all the cars stop to get gas. there is one big huge oil spot, but it has clean spots in it. the clean spots is where people spilled gasoline and it dissolved away the oil stain.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 13:57:20 No.879266
>>879240
Thanks for the response and the suggestion! I am reading all replies and trying to determine which method and cleaning materials will be most-likely to help with my situation, while also factoring in safety issues and accessibility of materials and convenience of buying/using them.

You seem quite sure of your method of using gas and cat litter, and seem to make a good point with the gas station analogy, so I'm certainly willing to at least consider trying this.

I must ask, though, will this gas+cat litter option likely work with motor oil and power steering fluid stains that have been on the concrete for several months (and for over a year, with regard to the oil stains)?

Also, to get rid of the considerable amount of dirt that has accumulated on top of/along with the oil and power steering fluid stains on the surface of the concrete, should I just scrape/sweep it off and specifically NOT spray any water on the stains to try to remove some of the surface stains?

Or would using a water hose to spray off the dirt and some of the oil/power steering fluid stains, and then allowing it to dry in the sun for a few hours, likely help?

If you would respond and clarify this for me, I would appreciate it!

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-24 18:06:29 No.879354
>>879266
>I must ask, though, will this gas+cat litter option likely work with motor oil and power steering fluid stains that have been on the concrete for several months (and for over a year, with regard to the oil stains)?
gasoline always dissolves oil, the age of the oil won't matter
>Also, to get rid of the considerable amount of dirt that has accumulated
you can spray water to get the dirt off first, but to get the oil off the concrete must be totally dry. if you get it wet then the gasoline isn't going to do anything, since gasoline floats on water

note that this method does not work on asphalt, since the gasoline will also dissolve the tar in the asphalt (this is why gas stations always have concrete where you stop your car to put gas in it)

>>
OP 2015-09-24 18:34:28 No.879367
>>879217
>oil/power steering fluid stains?
Actually the stated above post and deal with your own O.C.D traumas, but appears you are losing the battle.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-25 05:26:29 No.879633
>>879354
Thanks for the response and the detailed information. Using some gasoline to dissolve some of the oil definitely seems to be a good/effective method; but I have to ask about potential dangers while using the gasoline outside on the concrete? Should I just pour a fairly small amount of gas on the oil stains (like 1/2 cup)? Or will I likely need to pour enough gas to thoroughly cover the stains and soak in?

Also, how long should I let the gas soak in after I pour it on the stains? 10 minutes? 30 minutes? An hour? Longer?

And will the gasoline also likely work to dissolve/remove the power steering fluid stains?

>>879367
I think you may have left out a word in that post, so it's a little confusing. Were you just trying to say that you were suggesting to check out >>>/adv/ for both the oil stain question AND the O.C.D. issues?

Also, someone mentioned on another forum that they used Pour-N-Restore Oil Stain Remover and that it worked really well for them. Has anyone on here tried this stuff? Or does anyone have reason to believe that this product might work well for my oil and power steering fluid stains?

Link to product for 16 oz bottle for $9: http://www.pour-n-restore.com/products/oil-stain-remover.html

> Pic related: Pour-N-Restore Oil Stain Remover

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-25 05:42:22 No.879640
Kitty litter, stack of news paper on top of it. Soaks up the bulk of it. Do it as soon as possible.

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-25 05:45:09 No.879641
>>879640
Do that to get any liquid still up.

Then use
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Seal-Krete-64-oz-Oil-Stain-Remover-141064/203380202

>>
Anonymous 2015-09-25 06:51:44 No.879653
phosphoric acid will take care of that. find it in the paint section at a home improvement store. works great.

I've never used it on a mess that bad, so you might want to try cleaning some of the grime off first, or use it to clean the residue left behind from other methods. can't see where oil and transmission fluid stains were on my driveway after this.

Google process/safety/etc.







[  3  /  a  /  adv  /  an  /  c  /  cgl  /  ck  /  cm  /  co  /  diy  /  fa  /  fit  /  g  /  i  /  ic  /  jp  /  k  /  lit  /  m  /  mlp  /  mu  /  n  /  o  /  p  /  po  /  q  /  sci  /  sp  /  tg  /  toy  /  trv  /  tv  /  v  /  vg  /  vp  /  w  /  wg  /  wsg  /  x  ]

Contact me | All the content on this website come from 4chan.org. All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.

Dofus quêtes

Page loaded in 0.015031 seconds.