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/lit/ Literature

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Anonymous 2016-10-26 01:58:43 No.8658864

[Missing image file: ]

When it comes to American literature, it seems /lit/ only cares about Moby-Dick, Faulkner, and postmodernism.

Could we get a thread to discuss Steinbeck and Hemingway? Which one do you prefer and why?


>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:01:24 No.8658873
>>8658864
I left a hundred dollar bill in that exact copy of GoW when I returned it to the library today and I'm freaking out right now. Gonna be there first thing in the morning to check and ask after it.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:04:38 No.8658884
>>8658864
>postmodernism

There's that word again

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:08:04 No.8658895
>>8658864
East of Eden is considerably better than this haul.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:10:13 No.8658901
>>8658864

I struggled through this. I did not enjoy it. This was about 13 years ago, though, as a younger man.

Should I try it again?

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:12:02 No.8658905
>>8658901
No. I repeat: East of Eden. Also, Of Mice and Men and Canary Row are not bad for novellas.

Better yet, though: don't read Steinbeck. There are so many better writers to spend your limited time as a sentient being on.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:16:42 No.8658921
I've only read of Mice and Men and the Pearl from Steinbeck and both were brilliant . Great author

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:17:00 No.8658922
>>8658905

I own both Grapes of Wrath and East of Eden, but I never picked up East of Eden because of my experience with Grapes of Wrath. Of Mice and Men I just watched the movie, to be shamefully honest.

I don't know. Grapes of Wrath just really turned me off.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:18:37 No.8658929
>>8658922
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKKpmbcSe5E

At least we got this out of it, as well as a great movie.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:19:14 No.8658932
>>8658864
>>8658864
"The dusty plains were red and dusty and hot. The hot dusty plains, with their red sun, gleaming through the duster, smoldering, was covered with dust. Dust covered all, including the hot plains that sat under the red sky in which a red sun glared through the dust. Blah blah blah. Ten more pages of dust over everything." -John Steinhack

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Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:19:55 No.8658934
>>8658895
>>8658901
>>8658922

What don't you turds like about The Grapes of Wrath?

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:21:01 No.8658938
>>8658934
see:
>>8658932

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:21:25 No.8658942
>>8658905
>Canary Row
kek.

Seriously though, Cannery Row is glorious. He breathes so much life into the cast and the valley. If you're a Steinbeck fan you'll cherish the experience and remember them for decades to come.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:23:18 No.8658948
>>8658934
Even Steinbeck was ashamed of the plebs when he won a Nobel. The head of the committee resigned in disgust.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:23:56 No.8658953
>>8658938
I could paraphrase and overgeneralize to make any novel look bad.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:24:09 No.8658954
>>8658948
Is this true? I never heard this.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:25:11 No.8658958
>>8658953
Feel free, but I feel like my rendition betters the original.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:27:06 No.8658962
>>8658958
>>8658932

It gave me a lul. Steinbeck's extended nature descriptions are an acquired taste.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:29:29 No.8658967
>>8658962
Eating phonebooks is similarly an acquired taste. Just trust me. Eat one page at a time till you've gotten through at least half of it. By then I guarantee you'll love it.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:33:22 No.8658975
I want to talk about Orwell and Huxley.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:53:47 No.8659024
I'm a Hemingway man.

poor Santiago ;_;

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:55:11 No.8659029
>>8658975
>>>/sffg/

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 02:57:01 No.8659035
Can we talk bout Hawthorne?

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 03:06:16 No.8659070
Can we talk about Thoreau and Emerson?

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 03:08:40 No.8659077
>>8658864
can we talk about franzen

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 03:09:07 No.8659078
>>8659070
Emerson is the first worthwhile writer mentioned in this thread since OP invoked Melvy and Fucknard

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 03:16:37 No.8659108
>>8658954
He pulled that out of his ass.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 03:16:42 No.8659109
>>8659070
yo whats the deal with emersons zine "dial" read about it at the beginning of the portable thoreau?

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 03:20:50 No.8659120
>>8658864
I really liked Grapes of Wrath.

It really captured the stigmas surrounding organized labor, the workers can't organize because that's "Bolsheviky" while the growers can form a cartel and manipulate supply, wages, and prices. Even the people in town who didn't participate in agriculture volunteered their valuable time to shut down the farm labor union.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 03:23:27 No.8659129
>>8658942
Thanks, Time Life: Classics.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 04:57:26 No.8659433
>>8659120
I also like literature because it sheds like on the material conditions of the working class and their exploitation at the hands of Capitalism. Have you ever read "Boy Meets Tractor" China Leningrad? I think you'd really like it!

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 05:28:14 No.8659500
if i like twain and melville, what else might i like?

i find steinbeck to be too melodramatic and simple, though i've only read of mice and the pearl. hemingway i need to revisit; the old man and the sea was one of the first books i ever read. i've since read the sun also rises and a number of his short stories.

recs? i like humour and prose

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 05:30:54 No.8659514
Vonnegut

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 05:40:18 No.8659538
>>8659500
Ulysses is in my opinion one of the funniest novels in the language. And if you could handle Moby-Dick and find it humorous then you'd be fine with Ulysses.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 08:49:56 No.8659845
>>8659500
Joseph Conrad is what your body needs.

>>
Anonymous 2016-10-26 09:43:34 No.8659947
>>8659500
Read, A Moveable Feast. The entire book is just a hilarious memoir of Hemingway fucking around in Paris. At one point Fitzgerald comes up to him crying because his wife told him his dick is small, so they visit the Louvre together to look at Greek statues.







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