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/sci/ Science & Math

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 19:28:19 No.5548699

[Missing image file: head.jpg]

I need a little help whit this.What Exactly is the Higgs Boson?


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Schaiffe 2013-02-20 19:30:43 No.5548710
>>5548699
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIg1Vh7uPyw

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 19:30:56 No.5548711
A particle that exists due to spontaneous symmetry breaking of the higgs field.

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 19:37:43 No.5548732
>>5548699
In quantum field theory and its derivatives, any given real field you choose is defined everywhere. It might be zero, but it exists. So there's an EM field defined everywhere in the universe, but in a pure true isolated vacuum it'd just be equal to zero. Sound good?

Now fields naturally tend to exist in their lowest energy state. This is usually zero (which intuitively makes sense), but doesn't have to be. There's this thing called a Higgs field that is a field which helps to cause inertial mass through some way I still don't really understand (if someone tries to tell you they do, be skeptical- it's not impossible, but if I'm playing the odds the chances of anyone on this board really understanding it is low as it's doctoral level stuff). This field's lowest natural state is a non-zero one, which is why everything has mass. Following?

Fields can only be excited in certain frequency amounts. The first and lowest minimum excitation state is localized in particles (at least, in their treatment in QFT- this doesn't match the intuitive picture of a particle but works out to be roughly the same thing). A higgs boson is the minimum excitation of the higgs field, it's a "force carrier" for the field in the same way a gluon is.

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 19:40:38 No.5548746
Very helpful thank you, but let me get one thing straight. The Higgs boson is responsible for all the mass in the universe. Correct or Incorrect?

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 19:43:56 No.5548760
>>5548746
Incorrect. QCD is also a source of mass.

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 19:59:28 No.5548814
>>5548760
not just QCD. its the main one, but the electroweak force also contributes, as well as gravity, to the mass of composite particles.

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 20:00:44 No.5548820
>>5548746
no, just the mass of elementary particles. the rest is due to energy, potential or kinetic.

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Genius 2013-02-20 20:08:30 No.5548840
>>5548732
I understand it. The higgs field basically causes low energy state particles to either go one way or another left or right etc, even though there is symmetry.

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 20:14:13 No.5548849
>>5548840
thats just an analogy. the higgs field at its minimum energy can be continually transformed between different configurations (left or right, in an abstract plane). this freedom makes one of the particle have no mass while the other (which will change the energy if transformed) gives you the massive bosons

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 20:15:30 No.5548852
Is QED a source of mass?

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 20:17:31 No.5548857
>>5548760
Gotta be careful here .. QCD, or to be more specific, the gluon-self-interactions give gluons a dynamic mass. The Higgs-boson provides the W and Z bosons with a mass.

Why do we need Higgs at all? If you just put a static mass term into the equations of the W and Z bosons, you violate everything that makes the standard model such a pretty symmetrical concept. Since experiments have shown that W and Z bosons have actually quite a large amount of mass, we needed a way to deliver that mass without screwing up the beautiful symmetries. And Higgs (and others!) had some ideas long before the actual masses were measured..

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 20:23:31 No.5548876
>>5548857
not just bosons, fermions also have a higgs.

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 20:24:08 No.5548877
>>5548852
any energy is.

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 20:24:50 No.5548879
So gluons would have to have mass because they mediate the strong force, If they had no mass, then the distance the force can cover is zero.

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 20:27:52 No.5548888
>>5548876
I knew that there is some fermion-Higgs coupling but I never read about their proposed nature. But the coupling alone doesn't work the same way as it does with the W and Z bosons, right?

>>5548879
Eh, it's more intricate. Gluons are self-interacting because of their non-abelian nature (wiki it). This fact comes with a plethora of consequences, one of them being this dynamic mass thing. And I don't think your last point is valid. The exchange boson of QED, the photon, has no mass, and yet its range is infinite.

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 20:28:54 No.5548894
>>5548879
no, if it has no mass its range would be infinite, like electromagnetism. having mass makes the particle decay into other particles making it a short range force (before it can decay it has to mediate the force).

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 20:34:01 No.5548911
>>5548888
>But the coupling alone doesn't work the same way as it does with the W and Z bosons, right?
I think its pretty much the same, but without the symmetry breaking (since all of the fermions have mass.)

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 20:40:38 No.5548933
But QCD at high density is that, by thinking about it, one discovers a fruitful new perspective on the traditional problems of confinement and chiral-symmetry breaking.

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Anonymous 2013-02-20 21:26:58 No.5549102
>>5548746
I'm >>5548732 for what it's worth
From what I understand- and I want to be clear, while I know enough QFT to speak semicompetently about this I'm by no means an expert- for` a general answer that encompasses the familiar concept of mass the answer would be no, but (just to avoid future confusion) in many contexts where the higgs boson is actually discussed it's the sole cause of what's called mass there.







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